An insight into Gen Ys ordering habits

24 February, 2016 by
Danielle Bowling

A new study conducted by online ordering platform, EatNow.com.au has shed light on what influences the ordering habits of Australia’s Gen Y diners.

The survey of 1,922 people found that 46 percent of Australian adults under the age of 25 order food based on taste, with price the top consideration for 35 percent of respondents.

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It also found that 39 percent of Millenials have difficulty affording proteins such as seafood and meat, while 53 percent struggle to afford wholefoods – defined as food that has been processed or refined as little as possible and is free from additives or other artificial substances.

When ordering takeaway, 45 percent say they wouldn’t pay more than $20 per person.

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While the demographic is familiar with the Paleo diet, thanks to celebrity endorsements by chefs including Pete Evans, 72 percent said they wouldn’t adopt the diet themselves. Fifty-three percent would consider forgoing highly processed carbs like puffed rice or wheat flake cereals if it improved their health.

“It’s interesting that young Australians are inspired by, and follow the lives of, Insta-famous people online, yet are selective about which lifestyle habits they follow,” said EatNow spokesperson Kim Russell.  “We see that young Australians are struggling to afford some proteins and wholefoods, which suggests that price is clearly one of the motivations behind Gen Y’s not adopting the [Paleo] diet trend. The fact that more than half are willing to forego highly processed carbs shows that they are open to making dietary changes, it just has to be realistic for their income level and lifestyle.”

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The data also revealed that when young Australians choose pre-made meals, it’s largely because it’s convenient  (39 percent). Craving a meal they couldn’t cook themselves is the second biggest motivation for ordering in (25 percent), while wanting to treat themselves (17 percent) and saving time (16 percent) were less common considerations.